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Managing Life after a Fracture

After suffering a fracture, it’s tempting to take the easy path and lie on a couch all day, waiting for the cast to come off. That could be a big mistake. If your doctor has told you to stay as active as possible, that is exactly what you should do. There are 2 aspects to this. The first is to be active at home and the second is to go out and resume your normal activities as far as possible. Of course, everything must be done with your doctor’s approval.

Staying Active At Home

Make your home compatible with your mobility restrictions. Get your friends and family to help you.


  • Rearrange furniture to create comfortable pathways and movement spaces throughout the house.
  • All homes have clutter. Clear away all the non-essentials, especially things that can cause a fall.
  • Remove rugs and carpets and if that is not possible, tape down the edges so you do not trip on them.
  • Add lighting to any dimly lit places in the house and keep nightlights on at night.
  • Install handrails on stairs and grab bars in the bathroom.
  • Always keep a phone in your pocket so you can call for help when you need it.
  • Keep mentally active. Watching TV is fine, but there is a reason they call it the “idiot box.” Read, do crossword and jigsaw puzzles or play online games to keep your mind stimulated and active.
  • Use your phone to stay in touch with friends and relatives. Social interaction, even if only verbal, will keep you bright and cheerful.

Going Out

No matter how much you can do at home, staying indoors all the time can make you bored and the dullness and lassitude that sets in can affect you both mentally and physically. Travelling with a fracture is not easy – besides the problems of mobility that arise from being in a wheelchair, on crutches or a walker, having an arm in a sling and other restrictions, you need to be able to travel in safety and comfort to prevent making the injury worse, Trying to board public transport can be not just difficult but also dangerous. Contorting yourself, cast and all, into a taxi or a friend’s car can be extremely uncomfortable. Falling or stressing the fracture could do serious damage and affect your recovery. The best way to travel with a fracture is by using Non-Emergency Medical Transportation (NEMT). The special vehicles available will reduce the stress of getting on and off and you will be able to travel in comfort. Additionally, the drivers are trained in the special requirements of medical transportation so you do not have to worry about the injury during your trip. Whether it is an essential trip, or just going on a social visit, NEMT allows you to travel in comfort and safety. Before choosing an NEMT provider, check out its qualifications, reputation, the range of services and whether the types of vehicles available contain those that meet your specific needs. If you are a senior citizen, check to see if seniors’ discounts are available.

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