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A Change of Scenery is Good Medicine

Being immobile after sickness, surgery or injury can be very depressing. Being stuck in the same place, often in the same room, day after day can suck the strength out of a person as much as the reason for being immobile in the first place. There is a reason behind the old saying “variety is the spice of life.” The mind and body both need the stimulus of change to stay alert and gain strength. Without this “spice” life can be bland and dull which could cause the patient to become withdrawn and inward looking. As any doctor will say, a positive attitude is an essential part of any recovery, from any kind of sickness or injury. A change of scene can be the stimulus that hastens recovery or, if the condition is a permanent one, makes life happier.

Transportation can be a Problem

There are two factors that limit mobility and the ability to travel. The first, of course, is the physical condition of the patient. Some conditions may not allow for excessive movement or traveling even short distances. This is beyond the caregiver’s control. The second issue is that of finding the appropriate transport.  Many medical conditions do not permit a person to sit in a regular car seat. Even if there is no apparent pain or discomfort, travel could exacerbate the condition, the signs of which will only appear later. However, if there is no medical reason for the patient to remain in only one location, there is a safe, convenient and comfortable way to transport those who cannot travel by normal car or public transport. That is by the use of Non-Emergency Medical Transport (NEMT). NEMT is different from an ambulance which is meant only for transporting patients to and from a hospital or other medical facility. It cannot be used for transporting a patient to a social occasion, a visit to a park or another place that makes them happy, or any of the other outings the healthy take for granted but which mean so much to those for whom going out is a problem. NEMT can take patients to where they need to go and, equally importantly, where they want to go.

Finding the Right NEMT

When looking for an NEMT service, the key factors to keep in mind are:


  • Being fully insured, licensed and bonded
  • The availability of the right type of vehicle - one that meets the special requirements of the patient
  • Experience in transporting the elderly and those with mobility limitations
  • Drivers who are trained in the special requirements of medical transportation
  • Familiarity with the area to find the most convenient and comfortable route to the destination and back
  • Punctuality – keeping a patient waiting for a trip that he or she is looking forward to is not a good thing
  • Reasonable pricing. This is important because once the benefits of the ability to go out are seen; there will be more need to use the service.

A Non-Emergency Medical Transportation service that offers all this and more is the one to use.  The patient will benefit from the travel and be happier and healthier. This, in turn, will make the job of the caregivers an easier one.

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