Skip to main content

Vacationing with Children with Special Needs

Taking a child with special needs on a vacation is not easy. A lot of children can get nervous or anxious when they experience change. It is terrifying for them to take time out of their room, house, and city -- but if you plan well, you can make the whole vacation worthwhile.
 
1. Communicate to the child about the trip:
 
Before you start preparing for the trip, prepare your children for the trip. Talk to them – tell them why you want to go, things to expect, and so on. If it’s hard for them to understand you then communicate through pictures. Create a storyboard of what the entire vacation will be like. The more you talk about the trip in a positive way, the easier will be for the children to accept the idea of a vacation.
 
2. Pack for Comfort:
 
A week before you plan to leave for the holiday, get a suitcase and place it open in the bedroom of your children. Ask them to put anything they might need on the vacation into the suitcase -- blankets, stuffed animals, favorite toys, anything that will give them comfort during the trip. Make sure you include their favorite foods and books.
 
3. Enable Communication:
 
If your child has trouble communicating, make a picture book that contains pictures of things he/she might want or need: a pillow, a toilet, their favorite dolls/ blanket/toys, certain drinks or snacks, a towel, soap, and the like. Tell them they can get what they want by showing you the picture in the book. The more assured they are that their needs will be met, less nervous they will get.
 
4. Behavior Changes:
 
Even ordinary kids can start behaving differently when on the road than they do normally—usually by acting out. You can handle this change, by giving them rewards when they do something right. Grab a sack full of fun, small surprises to give them every time they behave well-- or when they resist doing something wrong. However, for this to work, your rewards have to be consistent. Experts believe that erratic rewards can cause distrust.
 
5. The Endgame:
 
While it does take a lot of effort and forward-thinking to take your children with special needs on a vacation, if you are prepared and do it right, you will find that the togetherness and stimulation will often lead to your child making better developments. Especially if they lack in social or communication skills or have a low self-esteem. Vacations can definitely be a high-maintenance high-reward attempt for any parent.
 
If you are planning to take a road trip, another way you can ensure comfort and safety of your child is to hire a non-emergency medical transportation. These vehicles are extremely spacious and equipped with state of the art machines that your child may need during the journey.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Has Age Affected Your Driving?

For almost everyone, driving is an essential part of life. The ability to go where you want, when you want to, is important, but perhaps even more so is the feeling of independence that it creates. As long as we feel we can function independently, we are strong and confident. Take away this feeling of independence, and we feel weakened and insecure because we are dependent on others to take us where we want or need to go. Buses, taxis, and subways may not be workable alternatives because of mobility or other age-related problems, and the passenger does not feel he’s in control he when he’s not driving. This is something that many seniors feel when they stop driving . While there is no defined age at which a person must stop driving, there is no denying that increasing years and health issues affect a person’s ability to drive. The eyesight, strength, and reflexes of an 80 years old are not the same as when he/she was 18. Going to the DMV and getting a driving license renewed

Transportation Options for the Elderly

When a person is no longer able to drive, the effect of the loss of mobility and freedom can be devastating. In the cases of the elderly, who may have been driving for half a century or more, the loss is often traumatic. The loss of freedom to access and participate in those activities that have been a staple of life for decades can result in stress, depression and a range of other problems, both physical and mental. The effect that this loss of mobility has, is often not noticed by friends and loved ones because the elderly are frequently too stubborn or proud to let others know how it affects them. Hiding the impact and bottling it up inside only makes the problem worse and the depression continues to grow unseen, often till it reaches a breaking point. A frequently asked question is - why can’t the elderly use other forms of transport? Image Courtesy: Pexels The Other Options Public transport would appear to be an option. However, for many seniors, a bus or subway journey is

How to Transport a Bedridden Person

Transporting a bedridden person is difficult. However, there are various technologies and facilities that have made transportation easy. Here is how to move a bedridden person: Choose a Non-Emergency Medical Transport Company There are numerous non-emergency medical transportation providers in almost all cities of America. A lot of hospitals or doctors may have a preferred service that they may recommend if you do not have any preference. Also, in certain states, the hospital may help book a van for you. However, it is also easy to choose a company on your own. Search for a non-emergency medical transport online or on a phone directory. In case you do not know which one to select, you can ask your family, friends or even the hospital to recommend. Read also: Don’t Ignore Check-Ups that are Due During COVID-19 Another way to assist you in narrowing your choices is to ask the service provider about the prices. Those companies that offer extremely cheap or exorbitant prices should be dis