Skip to main content

How to choose the right form of mobility device for children with disability

We often take our ability to move for granted, but for some people even a tiny step can be hard to take. Being mobile increases a person’s ability to interact, learn, earn a living and socialize. Fortunately, for kids suffering from mobility impairments, a range of different mobility devices and aids are available to offer motion, access, support, and to enable them to live a fulfilling and active life.


Since there are so many mobility devices for kids with special needs, it is important to make the right assessment. Assessments help to determine a child’s functional ability, physical ability, age and environmental consideration.

Assess the child on the following factors:                                                                              

Physical ability assessments of a child has to be made by a medical expert such as an occupational or physical therapist, exercise physiologists, or physicians. They evaluate, posture, muscle strength, sensation, the skeletal system, vision/perception, peripheral nervous system, stamina, ambulation capabilities, and energy levels.

Functional ability:

Assessment of functional abilities includes, 

  • Determining the physical activities of a child
  • Finding where these physical activities take place
  • Identifying places where a child wants to go but cannot go without help
  • Taking out time to know the child, finding out about their dislikes and likes; finding out their limitations.
Environmental assessment:

Every aspect of the child’s physical environment should be assessed. Information must be gathered on the following:

  • Steps (height, number, and depth)
  • Exits and entrances (length and slope)
  • Floor coverings
  • Bathroom location
  • Doorways and hallways
  • Climate
Age:

The child’s age has to be kept in mind, considered from a range of perspectives. For kids, will they grow too big for the devices? For adults and children, what is the stability of their condition? Apart from this, what is the impact of age on future needs? It is important to discuss all such questions with a medical professional.

Choosing the right mobility device for your child

Once an assessment is made by analyzing different types of aids and devices, you can discuss what will best suit the needs of your child. These include wheeled mobility, ambulation, power wheelchairs and manual wheelchairs.

Ambulation Devices

Ambulation devices include canes, walking poles, crutches and walkers.

Wheeled Mobility

A range of manually-pushed and battery-powered devices offer wheeled mobility for people who find it hard to power themselves. Such devices comprise of knuckle boards, scooter boards, powered bicycles, tandem bikes, reclining bikes, and strollers.
 
Manual Wheelchairs

Basic manual wheelchairs have been here for decades and comprise of the base components of a back, seat, and leg/footrest, driven on four wheels. The basic model of a manual wheelchair is heavy and has little adjustments. Lightweight wheelchairs are high-strength and can be adjusted for comfort. Light weight, adjustable wheelchairs decrease the center of gravity.
 
Power Wheelchairs

Powered wheelchairs tend to run on batteries and can cost between $3,000 and $12,000. A basic power wheelchair can be used by someone who can control a joystick with ease and has no weakness, spasticity or tremors in the upper portion of the body. 

If your child suffers from a disability and has to travel long distance, then you can also consider hiring a non-emergency medical transportation van. These vans have been specially built to transport people with disabilities.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Transportation Options for the Elderly

When a person is no longer able to drive, the effect of the loss of mobility and freedom can be devastating. In the cases of the elderly, who may have been driving for half a century or more, the loss is often traumatic. The loss of freedom to access and participate in those activities that have been a staple of life for decades can result in stress, depression and a range of other problems, both physical and mental. The effect that this loss of mobility has, is often not noticed by friends and loved ones because the elderly are frequently too stubborn or proud to let others know how it affects them. Hiding the impact and bottling it up inside only makes the problem worse and the depression continues to grow unseen, often till it reaches a breaking point. A frequently asked question is - why can’t the elderly use other forms of transport? Image Courtesy: Pexels The Other Options Public transport would appear to be an option. However, for many seniors, a bus or subway journey is

Making Everyday Life Easier with Proper Wheelchairs

  In case you are suffering from a health issue or personal injury that constrains your capability to move, you can attain independence with the help of a wheelchair that will suit your needs. Some of the important elements you can take into account when choosing a wheelchair are the type of surface and the several climate conditions you may have to handle. You could also get wheelchair ramps, add-ons, and lifts that can make living easier, especially if you have to utilize a wheelchair long-term or temporarily. Manual Wheelchairs Are Easy to Handle and Lightweight Manual wheelchairs are the best for those who can propel the machine with their arms. This is the most cost-effective option with no recharge and batteries. Moreover, since it is extremely lightweight, it can be transported easily. 1.Most standard manual wheelchairs have a fixed footrest and armrest. However, the footrests can easily be moved up or down. 2. Detachable manual wheelchairs offer a removable footrest and armrest

Has Age Affected Your Driving?

For almost everyone, driving is an essential part of life. The ability to go where you want, when you want to, is important, but perhaps even more so is the feeling of independence that it creates. As long as we feel we can function independently, we are strong and confident. Take away this feeling of independence, and we feel weakened and insecure because we are dependent on others to take us where we want or need to go. Buses, taxis, and subways may not be workable alternatives because of mobility or other age-related problems, and the passenger does not feel he’s in control he when he’s not driving. This is something that many seniors feel when they stop driving . While there is no defined age at which a person must stop driving, there is no denying that increasing years and health issues affect a person’s ability to drive. The eyesight, strength, and reflexes of an 80 years old are not the same as when he/she was 18. Going to the DMV and getting a driving license renewed