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Recreational Activities for kids with special needs

“There are so many opportunities in life that the loss of two or three capabilities is not necessarily debilitating. A handicap can give you the opportunity to focus more on art, writing, or music.” -- Jim Davis

Physical activity is important for all kids, particularly for those with disabilities, because it helps them reduce their chances of developing high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. According to experts, disabled children who are encouraged to remain physically active have better motor control, are more social and less likely to suffer from emotional issues such as depression. San Mateo offers a range of activities for special needs kids to help them develop and grow into self-sufficient citizens.

Dance for change:

Located in Palo Alto, this program has been specifically designed for kids suffering from autism and related developmental issues.  It is to help these kids make friends, develop stronger bodies and have fun.

E-soccer:

Exceptional children’s soccer takes place every Saturday 11:00-12:00 pm, at Booth Bay Park, Foster City. The program caters to disabled kids from ages three and above. Although free of cost, parents have to enroll their kids in time to avoid the waiting list.

Quest therapeutic instruction & recreational camp:

With its campuses in Fremont and Danville, this treatment program combines behavior modification, group therapy, and camp activities for kids with mild emotional and social behavioral problems.

Wheelchair athletic program:

These programs have been designed to cater to wheelchair-bound kids. Enthusiasts can enroll in wheelchair sports teams, swim teams, soccer teams to learn a new sport while indulging in physical activity.

Foster City Library:

The library offers several disability services including, ADA computers with large screens, accessible restrooms, service desks and handicapped parking spaces. Librarians are trained to be patient with the special needs kids.

Special Needs Aquatic Program:

Located in Palo Alto, SNAP strives to assist kids with disabilities such as cerebral palsy, developmental problems, autism and sensory integration dysfunction. The program tries to instill a sense of pride and self-confidence while helping them build stronger bodies.

Classes are held by skilled and experienced staff and every child receives personal attention while having the opportunity to socialize and learn with peers.

Gymboree Play Center:

Located at San Mateo, the play center offers a large, soft-padded area where kids can play and roam free. It is a great place for children to learn and stay active.

Non-medical transportation vans:

One of the services that has really helped kids with disabilities and special needs is the non-medical transportation service. These vans are extremely spacious and designed to cater to the requirements of children who may need special attention while travelling. The vehicles come equipped with wheelchair rams and other equipment that makes the ride comfortable. Parents can hire non-medical transportation to take their kids to attend activities, doctor’s appointments and even for a trip to another city.

Enjoyable and creative pastimes have a big impact on the lives of special needs children. Physical activity gives them a positive outlet for expending their energy and helps them improve their agility, confidence and strength. Creative activities offer these kids a safe platform to express their emotions and thoughts.

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